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20121201
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.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
, a member of president obama's inaugural faith council, argues that america should strive to be a pluralistic country where religion is a bridge to cooperation rather than a fissure between people. this is about an hour 20. >> good evening, everyone and thanks for being here. i am very excited to be with my u.s. best friend, eboo patel. i've had a wonderful time reading this book, and am very excited about having this conversation with him and then drawing you into that conversation. one of the delights about his book is his disclosing something of his own spiritual practice, particularly during the holy season of ramadan. he had many when he said that prior to entering the day he would get up, have a small breakfast, and then have a time with -- [inaudible] one of my favorite poets. and i thought it was really wonderful if we all could have kind of a moment of censuring around eboo reading one of his favorite poems. how does that sound? >> all right. thank you for the invitation to thank you all for being here. so, this is a poem that actually first heard where rumi is bu
are foreigners in a strange land. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america or 12th century venice. writing about the recent past is not easy, as i learned this time around. first, there are people you have to talk to. [laughter] and while i was blessed from beginning to end by having some fascinating people to talk to about joe kennedy including large numbers of kennedys, i much prefer working from written documents to listening to people talk and trying to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them, what they think they know but they don't know at all. the other difficulty about writing about our recent past is that it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it. to construct the pastness of the past that is so close to us. and yet this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our common sense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demiesfy, demythologize, to move beyond the cliches about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about
limbaugh's "the great destroyer," charles kessler's i am the change, obama's america, quite critical of president obama. do these books sell well? >> they do largely because they serve rightly or wrongly as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy into at and as a result of these books have a very active audience and president obama has been reelected, i am sure these publishers with conservative inference or conservatively inclined will predict to sell well and they will continue to appeal to an audience that demand these books. >> have you interviewed these critical of others? >> no. let's see. glen beck, but he is not recently taken on exactly president obama. sort of interesting. this is generally true, whoever's in power in the white house, the opposite political slant does better. liberal democrat in the white house, when there's a conservative in the white house, president bush, critical of the president and do better. it was being questioned about jobs or something and he said look what i'm doing for the book industry because there were so many books out, critical of him, the
is in the united states of america. [laughter] also jim jones, bernie madoff and all of those claiming by and let your faith they can supervene the natural law and if there were such a thing as historical necessity, why in the world what we have to aide? portion of a human being but claimed they would save under us these ideologues and opportunist visionaries fugs seem to lead that they actually emerge from and right from the power and held by the mass confusion of the unbalanced group. the political impulse to the submission for all of those explained is more reasonable than out motive forms represented the government religion and culture may also be seen to the impulse buy those in extremists to seek out magic. the quiet of the psychic healer and energy for their past and the worshiper of the political strongman trade autonomy for magic. but the power of the magic feathers and beads and stimulus might the resurrection cannot be attempted without sacrifice. here the sacrifice of reason, the contemporary equivalent of dashing the flesh to make it rain. of course it implies a supranatural recipien
to see obama's america are quite critical of president obama. trained to commit to these sell well? >> guest: they do because they serve right your wrong light as a counterpoint. many readers wish to buy and another results have a very active audience in a president obama has been reelected, i'm sure these publishers with conservative in prince or conservative and crime will continue to produce books that sell well because they will appeal to an audience that demands these books. >> host: bob minzesheimer can have you interviewed critical authors? >> guest: no. going back has not recently taken on exactly president obama. it's sort of interesting. who's ever in power in the white house, the opposite would of course i does better. a democratic in the white house tends to do better. then there's the conservative under president bush, they tend to do better. in fact, bush at one point being questioned about jobs are sent and says look what i'm doing for the book industry because there were so many books out critical of him come assorted middle of the second term. >> guest: and the iro
. this is true as much of the recent past as it is of colonial america. writing about the recent past is not easy to tailor this time around. first, there were people got to talk to. i was blessed from beginning to end by having fascinating views. i much prefer working for but documents than listening to people, tried to figure out what's real, what's imagined, what they know, what they think they know because someone told them what they think they know, but they don't know at all. the other difficult thing about writing about more recent past is it's not always easy to establish one's distance from it, to construct a pass that is so close to them. and yet, this is what historians have to do. our job is to complicate, to take apart our commonsense view of the recent past, to interrogate what we think we know, to demystify cavity mythologize, move beyond clichÉs about winners and losers, saints and sinners, about the wisdom and courage of our forefathers, especially those of the greatest generation. our job as historian, when grounded, delays of joseph p. kennedy whispered me a surrogate antique
, quote, the mess we've inherited which was previously nobody as the united states of america. [laughter] see also jim jones, bernie madoff and all those claiming by intellect or faith they can supervene the natural laws. if there was such a thing as historical necessity, why in the world would we have to aid it? must one not question at least theceps of proportion of a human being who proclaimed they will save it under us the seas cease to rise? these idealogues, op to have tunists, walks and thugs seem to lead, but they actually emerge for and ride for power impelled by the massed confusion of the imbalanced group. the political impulse to submission for all it is explained in its outmoded forms may also be seen, aligned to the impulse -- [inaudible] the quiet of the psychic healer and energy therapist, bloodless surgeon and the worshiper of the political strong band each trade autonomy for magic. but the power of the magic feathers, the magic beans, the stimulus -- like the resurrection of tinker bell -- cannot be attempted without sacrifice. here the sacrifice of reason. the contempo
a filter sitting down together. maybe that image. or maybe you'd rather think of something from the america of that area roughly, maybe a little bit earlier, the great depression, to get an image in your mind of the great depression. if you're having trouble, think of it tired him a worried looking at another stare off into the distance with a ragamuffin child leaning on each shoulder. can you find that famous iconic image in your mind? that image by dorothea lange called migrant mother that has come to symbolize the great depression. the images you've conjured up in your mind have been black and white. very, very likely. so i'd like you to do the same exercise but think of japanese imprisonments. think of the imprisonment of japanese americans during the war. so what are you picturing? does it look like this? a bunch of young, japanese-american grossing promoters dancing? this is a photograph taken by a government photographer at the granada relocation center, also known as the macho in 1943. so if this is that which you had in mind, what's different about it? well, it's a photo of young a
moment in america's history. the big themes that you see in the speech and the broader story working through the election are kind of i think of four that i will be focusing on. i will be brief on each of them to give enough time for questions. first off, the obvious background of the cold war and a new style of conservative vision of foreign policy that i will explain. directly related to that, there is an enormous divide within the republican party in 1952. that shouldn't surprise any of us obviously. this is always a very divided party the tensions within the republican party that the speech and election point to are important. the third thing that i think is perhaps most important is the american tradition of populism for and what richard nixon is doing to the populist tradition in this speech and for what the election and the fourth and final thing is the style of politics nixon developed. the subtitle of the book is about the rocking, socking the election of 1952 and that is nixon's conception of politics, it should be about a fight, being tough. that has a long lingering impac
and people and places. which organized and arranged 20th century america. joseph kennedy was a invalid type figure. he was everywhere. he was born in 1888. he lived through world war i. the 120s. he lived in hollywood at the moment of transition from silent films to talking films. he was on wall street during the boom and bust. he worked as part of the franklin roosevelt campaign team. he was the first chairman of securities and exchange commission and the maritime commission and the first irish-american to be ambassador for the court of st. james to great britain. he was also the father of the president and attorney general. a senator and the woman who did more for the mentally disabled in this country and this world than anyone else. a woman who will be as well known as her brothers, i think. the youngest to, the ambassador to ireland, jean kennedy smith, who was essential enraging piece. and senator edward kennedy, the longest-serving senator at his death in the united states senate. the story of joseph kennedy is the story of the man who spent his life moving back and forth from outside
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)